1666 Mound Street
Phone: (941) 365-5898
Fax: (941) 366-5728

Dr. Ted’s Blog

Dr-Ted-Meyer-With-Lion-In-Foreground

Behind the scenes: Dr. Ted Meyer during a photoshoot with SRQ!

Congratulations to Dr. Ted Meyer !!

Way to go Dr. Meyer and Meyer Pediatrics for being voted ” Sarasota’s Best Pediatrician”  five years in a row by the readers of SRQ Magazine.!

No Longer Accepting Amerigroup Medicaid or Amerigroup Fla Healthy Kids!!

Effective October 1, 2015- please be advised of the changes to your health plan. Amerigroup is no longer available in Sarasota County. Please choose a new health care plan or your child will be assigned to a provider based on your zip code.
Thank you

ATTENTION: FLORIDA BLUE SELECT PLAN MEMBERS:

EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY:

IF YOU ARE A FLORIDA BLUE SELECT PLAN MEMBER, PLEASE BE ADVISED THAT OUR OFFICE IS NON PARTICIPATING OR OUT OF NETWORK. UNFORTUNATELY, YOU MAY HAVE BEEN ADVISED THAT WE ACCEPT THIS FLORIDA BLUE PLAN OR WERE ALLOWED TO CHOOSE MEYER PEDIATRICS AS YOUR PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN BECAUSE THIS PLAN DOES OFFERS OUT OF NET WORK BENEFITS. AS A RESULT, OUR OFFICE WOULD BE LISTED AS A PROVIDER. I BELIEVE THIS IS MISLEADING TO THE PATIENT. THIS PLAN WILL PAY 50% OF BILLED CHARGES WITH THE BALANCE OF 50% AS COINSURANCE TURNED TO THE PATIENT. i ATTEMPTED TO CONTRACT WITH THIS LINE OF BUSINESS BUT WAS TOLD IT IS NOT AVAILABLE IN SARASOTA COUNTY. THIS BAFFLES OUR OFFICE AND WE WONDER HOW THIS PLAN WOULD BE AVAILABLE AS A CHOICE TO YOU IN THE FIRST PLACE. WE APOLOGIZE FOR ANY CONFUSION AND INCONVENIENCE THIS HAS OR WILL CAUSE OUR FAMILIES.

WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO DIRECT YOUR COMPLAINTS TO FLORIDA BLUE SELECT AND CHOOSE A NEW PLAN AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

No longer accepting Prestige Insurance

Effective September 1, 2015 –

All Prestige patients have been notified that are no longer participating with Prestige Health Care. Patients should call customer service and switch to Integral,  Staywell,  or Sunshine Health.

Thank you

Meyer Pediatrics Is Proud To Welcome Jill Langley, CPNP

Dear Patients and Families,

We are pleased and proud to introduce a third provider to Meyer Pediatrics:

Jill Langley, CPNP is happy to return to Meyer Pediatrics after receiving her advanced degree as a Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner from the University of South Florida. She returns with almost 19 years of Pediatric experience, working alongside Nancy triaging patients, answering phone calls, and administering vaccines almost a decade ago. Jill is available Monday, Tuesday and Friday for school & sport physicals, well check-ups and issues more comfortably discussed with a female healthcare provider.

We are very excited about adding Jill to our team of providers at Meyer Pediatrics, and look forward to seeing you get to know her!

Sincerely,

Dr. Ted and Staff

Flu Vaccines for All, 6 Months and Up !!

We have flu vaccines for the whole family, ages 6 months on up! It is recommended that all children receive the flu vaccine annually.  Don’t like shots? We offer painless intranasal flumist for most patients. If you would like your child to receive a flu vaccine please call the office to schedule an appointment or come in during walk-in hour. We will also vaccinate parents and/or grandparents for a self pay cost of $30 for injection and $40 for intranasal mist.

Maybe THIS will help people finally get past the fear of vaccines

1 MMR Vaccination Scandal Story

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3 MMR Vaccination Scandal Story
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MMR 7 Vaccination Scandal Story
MMR 8 Vaccination Scandal Story
MMR 9 Vaccination Scandal Story
MMR 10 Vaccination Scandal Story
mmr 11 Vaccination Scandal Story
MMR 12 Vaccination Scandal Story
MMR 13 Vaccination Scandal Story
MMR 14 Vaccination Scandal Story
MMR 15 Vaccination Scandal Story

A Great Book for Stretching Excercises


This is a wonderful and cheap paperback that has muscle group-specific exercises (how do I stretch my hamstrings?) and exercise-specific stretches as well (what do I do for soccer?). If you are tight or having muscle pains from sports (or aging, in my case) this book could help.

Stretching

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I haven’t encountered any source on this subject as broad, accessible, and easily applied as Bob Anderson’s classicStretching, a patient and friendly stand-in for my eight-grade P.E. teacher.

The 30th anniversary edition of this guidebook came out recently, with even more stretches and illustrations, and it’s easily the most comprehensive work on the subject. I love the activity-specific sections: cyclists, for instance, are shown stretches that not only address the muscle groups made tight and tense by our specific sport, but the stretches geared toward bike riders even include a bicycle to be utilized as a support. Activities from weightlifting to computer using get their own sections, too.

Organizationally,Stretchingshines. Tight neck? Rigid shoulders? Thumb through to your proscribed routine and get to work. With minimal flexibility but a willingness to make an effort, almost anyone can use this book to become more limber, healthier.

— Elon Schoenholz

 

Stretching: 30th Anniversary Revised Edition
By Bob Anderson, illustrations by Jean Anderson
2010, 240 pages
$14

Available fromAmazon

Why Stretch?
– Reduce muscle tension and make the body feel more relaxed
– Help coordination by allowing for freer and easier movement
– Make strenuous activities like running, skiing, tennis, swimming, and cycling easier because it prepares you for activity; it’s a way of signaling the muscles that they are about to be used.

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And Now the Wall Street Journal Weighs In on Autism

Lancet Retracts Study Tying Vaccine to Autism

 

The study that first suggested a link between vaccines and autism and spurred a long-running, acrimonious debate over the safety of vaccines has been retracted by the British medical journal that published it. The withdrawal supports the scientific evidence that vaccinations don’t cause autism, but isn’t likely to persuade advocacy groups that believe in a link.

A new autism study shows clusters of high autism rates in parts of California. WSJ’s health columnist Melinda Beck joins Simon Constable on the News Hub with more.

The 1998 study of 12 children triggered worry among British parents that the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine caused autism, and many decided not to immunize their children against measles, according to Richard Horton, editor in chief of the Lancet, which issued the retraction Tuesday. He called the study the “starting pistol,” though not the only cause, of the controversy.

Concern about the safety of vaccines, particularly regarding the preservative often used, thimerosal, which contains mercury, spread to the U.S. as well. Research has shown that as many as 2.1% of U.S. children weren’t immunized with the MMR vaccine in 2000, up from 0.77% of children in 1995, according to a 2008 study published in Pediatrics.

“This retraction by the Lancet came far too late,” said Paul Offit, chief of infectious diseases at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and a coinventor of a vaccination for babies against a gastrointestinal virus, Rotateq, that is marketed by Merck & Co. “It’s very easy to scare people; it’s very hard to unscare them.”

A widely cited 2004 statistical review of existing studies by nonprofit health-information provider the Institute of Medicine, which traced the vaccine theory back to the Lancet study, concluded there was no causal link between the MMR vaccine and autism. Some autism activist groups, however, continue to advocate against vaccinations for children, despite the lack of scientific evidence for such a link.

“Certainly the retraction of this paper doesn’t mean that MMR doesn’t cause autism and it’s all a farce,” said Wendy Fournier, president of the National Autism Association. It is “possible” that the MMR vaccine causes autism, she said, but “the science is not there in terms of the mechanism.” The concern is that measles virus has been found in children’s intestines after vaccination, said Ms. Fournier.

“No one is anti-vaccine,” she said. “It’s a matter of having vaccines be as safe as they can.”

A study published in 2008 by researchers from several universities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention examined children with gastrointestinal problems who had autism compared with those who didn’t have autism. They concluded there wasn’t any evidence that the vaccine was responsible for autism.

[0202vaccine]Associated Press

Ten of the 13 authors of the original paper, all of whom were researchers at the Royal Free Hospital and School of Medicine in London, partially retracted the paper in 2004. However, the first author, Andrew Wakefield, didn’t. Dr. Wakefield, who is now at the Thoughtful House Center for Children in Austin, Texas, didn’t immediately return phone calls seeking comment.

“Many consumer groups have spent 10 years waging a campaign against vaccines even in the face of scientific evidence,” said Dr. Horton of the Lancet. “We didn’t have the evidence back in 2004 to fully retract the paper but we did have enough concern to persuade the authors to partly retract the paper.”

The Lancet decided to issue a complete retraction after an independent regulator for doctors in the U.K. concluded last week that the study was flawed. The General Medical Council’s report on three of the researchers, including Dr. Wakefield, found evidence that some of their actions were conducted for experimental purposes, not clinical care, and without ethics approval. The report also found that Dr. Wakefield drew blood for research purposes from children at his son’s birthday party, paying each child £5 (about $8).

The Lancet’s Dr. Horton said the journal was particularly concerned about the ethical treatment of the children in the study, and that the children had been “cherry-picked” by the study’s authors rather than just showing up in the hospital, as described in the paper.

The authors “did suggest these children arrived one after another and this syndrome was apparent, which does lead you to think this is something serious,” said Dr. Horton.

“I hope this brings closure to this controversy,” said Fred Volkmar, an autism researcher and professor of psychiatry at the Yale Child Study Center who wasn’t involved in the Lancet study. “My fear, unfortunately, is that this won’t totally allay the fear of all parents.”

In the 1998 paper, Dr. Wakefield and his colleagues described 12 children with gastrointestinal problems. Eight experienced symptoms that were thought to be related to the MMR vaccine, according to their parents or a doctor, and nine of the 12 children exhibited autistic behaviors.

Dr. Wakefield has been outspoken about his concern about the measles vaccine. He has continually pushed the view that the vaccine caused autism, said Greg Poland, professor of medicine and infectious diseases at the Mayo Clinic and director of the vaccine research group in Rochester, Minn.

“With the retraction, the hypothesis that he put forward has been debunked,” said Dr. Poland.

—Peter Loftus contributed to this article.

Write to Shirley S. Wang at shirley.wang@wsj.com

More About Autism and Vaccines


This is from the British government and it’s equivalent to the American Academy of Pediatrics. They, too, in addition to the AAP, the World Health Organization and the American Committee on Immunization Practices have concluded that vaccines are not only safe but that they CATEGORICALLY DO NOT cause or contribute to autism, which is KNOWN to have genetic causes.


Study Linking Vaccine to Autism Broke Research Rules, U.K. Regulators Say

Nicky Broyd

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February 2, 2010 — The British doctor who led a study suggesting a link between the measles/ mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism acted “dishonestly and irresponsibly,” a U.K. regulatory panel has ruled.

The panel represents the U.K. General Medical Council (GMC), which regulates the medical profession. It ruled only on whether Andrew Wakefield, MD, and two colleagues acted properly in carrying out their research, and not on whether MMR vaccine has anything to do with autism.

In the ruling, the GMC used strong language to condemn the methods used by Wakefield in conducting the study.

In the study, published 12 years ago, Wakefield and colleagues suggested there was a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. Their study included only 12 children, but wide media coverage set off a panic among parents. Vaccinations plummeted; there was a subsequent increase in U.K. measles cases.

In 2004, 10 of the study’s 13 authors disavowed the findings. The Lancet, which originally published the paper, retracted it after learning that Wakefield — prior to designing the study — had accepted payment from lawyers suing vaccine manufacturers for causing autism.

Fitness to Practice

The GMC’s Fitness to Practise panel heard evidence and submissions for 148 days over two and a half years, hearing from 36 witnesses. It then spent 45 days deciding the outcome of the hearing. Besides Wakefield, two former colleagues went before the panel -John Walker-Smith and Simon Murch. They were all found to have broken guidelines.

The disciplinary hearing found Wakefield showed a “callous disregard” for the suffering of children and abused his position of trust. He’d also “failed in his duties as a responsible consultant.”

He’d taken blood samples from children attending his son’s birthday party in return for money, and was later filmed joking about it at a conference.

He’d also failed to disclose he’d received money for advising lawyers acting for parents who claimed their children had been harmed by the triple vaccine.

Not Over Yet

The GMC will next decide whether Wakefield and his former colleagues committed serious professional misconduct. That could lead to being struck off the medical register. That decision may not be taken for several more months.

Wakefield wasn’t in the hearing, but outside the GMC offices he told reporters, “Naturally I am extremely disappointed by the outcome of today’s proceedings. The allegations against me and against my colleagues are both unfounded and unjust.” He continued, “I invite anyone to examine the contents of these proceedings and come to their own conclusion.”

Wakefield was cheered by a group of parents outside the hearing who are still sure he is right, even though his findings have been widely discredited.

“It remains for me to thank the parents whose commitment and loyalty has been extraordinary,” he said. “I want to reassure them that science will continue in earnest.”

Wakefield now works in the U.S. at an autism center called Thoughtful House, which he helped found. In a statement on its web site the center states that it is “disappointed” by the GMC decision, believing the charges against the three doctors were “unfounded and unfair.”

On the web site’s “frequently asked questions” the center asks: “Has Dr. Wakefield been accused of any breach of medical ethics while serving as the Executive Director of Thoughtful House?” The answer is “Absolutely not.”

Safety of MMR Vaccine

The government and medical experts continue to stress that the MMR vaccine is safe.

The MMR triple vaccine was licensed in the U.S. in 1971 and first used in the U.K. in 1988. Over 100 countries now use it, and it is estimated that more than 500 million doses have been administered.

At the peak of the MMR scare in 2002, there were 1,531 articles about MMR in the U.K. national press; in 1998 there had been just 86.

Between 2001 and 2003, U.K. opinion polls showed that the percent of people believing the MMR vaccine to be safe dropped from over 70% to just over 50%.

U.K. Health Protection Agency figures show measles incidence increased dramatically following the drop in the number of children being vaccinated. The number of confirmed cases between 2007 and 2008 was 2,349, roughly equal to the combined total for the previous eleven years.

SOURCES:

U.K. General Medical Council.

General Medical Counsel, “Fitness to Practise Panel Hearing, 28 January 2010.”

Andrew Wakefield, MD.

House of Commons Library Measles and MMR Statistics.

Thoughtful House web site.

BMJ web site.

BBC News online